Aircrew Survival: Hot Land Survival circa 1990 FAA Federal Aviation Administration

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Federal Aviation Administration; Aircrew Survival: Hot Land Survival; from the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute.

Pilot Training Film playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCA6387BA013F9A4D

Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Survival_skills

Survival skills are techniques a person may use in a dangerous situation (e.g. natural disasters) to save themselves and others. These techniques are meant to provide basic necessities for human life: water, food, thermoregulation, shelter, habitat, the ability to think straight, to signal for help, to navigate safely, to avoid unpleasant and possibly fatal interactions with animals and plants, and to cure any incurred injury or ailments. Survival skills are often basic ideas and abilities that ancients invented and used themselves for thousands of years. Outdoor activities such as hiking, backpacking, horseback riding, fishing, and hunting all require basic wilderness survival skills, especially in handling emergency situations. Bushcraft and primitive living are most often self-implemented, but require many of the same skills…

A shelter can range from a “natural shelter”; such as a cave or a fallen-down tree, to an intermediate form of man-made shelter such as a debris hut, a tree pit shelter, or a snow cave, to completely man-made structures such as a tarp, tent, or a longhouse…

Fire

Making fire is recognized in the sources as significantly increasing the ability to survive physically and mentally. Lighting a fire without a lighter or matches, e.g. by using natural flint and steel with tinder, is a frequent subject of both books on survival and in survival courses. There is an emphasis placed on practicing fire-making skills before venturing into the wilderness. Producing fire under adverse conditions has been made much easier by the introduction of tools such as the solar spark lighter and the fire piston.

If you have a black powder firearm along, you can sometimes start a fire by ramming tinder down the barrel against the powder charge. Use charred cloth if available. Fire the gun up in the air, run and pick up the cloth and blow it into flame. Have a supply of tinder at hand so the cloth can be placed against it to start the fire.

Fire is presented as a tool meeting many survival needs. The heat provided by a fire warms the body, dries wet clothes, disinfects water, and cooks food. Not to be overlooked is the psychological boost and the sense of safety and protection it gives. In the wild, fire can provide a sensation of home, a focal point, in addition to being an essential energy source. Fire may deter wild animals from interfering with a survivor, however wild animals may be attracted to the light and heat of a fire.

Water

A human being can survive an average of three to five days without the intake of water. The issues presented by the need for water dictate that unnecessary water loss by perspiration be avoided in survival situations. The need for water increases with exercise.

A typical person will lose minimally two to maximally four liters of water per day under ordinary conditions, and more in hot, dry, or cold weather. Four to six liters of water or other liquids are generally required each day in the wilderness to avoid dehydration and to keep the body functioning properly. The U.S. Army survival manual does not recommend that you drink water only when thirsty, as this leads to under hydrating. Instead, water should be drunk at regular intervals. Other groups recommend rationing water through “water discipline”…

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